Nahuel Huapi

28 03 2009
The hikers

The hikers

In our whirlwind visit with Paul and Christine, we made some short trips to see different parts of the awesome Nahuel Haupi National Park around Bariloche.  Our first trip was to Pampa Linda, to see the massive Mt. Tronador (it means thunderer in Spanish).  We camped in Pampa Linda (it froze at night, our water bottles had ice in them in the morning!)  and made a few day hikes from our base camp there.  Pampa Linda has great views of the mountain. Read the rest of this entry »

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Alerces Park

19 03 2009
Alerce

Alerce

From Esquel, we took a trip to the Alerces National Park. Alerce trees are often cited as being similar to the giant sequoias in California (huge and old), but they are technically members of the cypress family.  Like redwoods, they are valued for their red-colored wood that is resistant to decomposition and are favored for use in decks and any other construction requiring durability.  Due to the desirable quality of the wood, they have been heavily logged and now the limited remaining stands of alerce trees are protected in Chile and Argentina, where they slowly grow in limited temperate rainforest regions.  We went into the park to camp and do a few hikes to see these protected trees. Read the rest of this entry »





Forest of the Araucaria

19 02 2009
Monkey puzzle

Monkey puzzle tree

The Araucaria District of Chile (just north of the Lakes District) has many volcanic peaks, in addition to ridges of basalt from volcanic activity and hotsprings. The soil is dark and fertile, supporting a diverse temperate rainforest and highland forests. Lower elevations have many types of southern beech (coigue, roble, etc) and canelo (from the magnolia family) trees, which look like hardwood trees from rainforests, and often have vines climbing on them.

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New Photos-Drainage and Landscaping of St. Catalina Convent

11 01 2009

So I have sinus infection and extra time to write about the drainage and landscaping at a convent in Arequipa. The convent was for nuns from wealthy families and they enjoyed large individual rooms within a larger complex that has not only great landscaping, but also a very advanced and ´progressive´ drainage system.

Drainage to flow through planter, from the 1700s!!

Drainage to flow through planter, from the 1700s!!

1700s flow control!!

1700s flow control!!

The courtyards have fruit trees such as fig, citrus, avocado, and what appears to be plum, in addition to rubber trees and decoratives like trailing lantana, honeysuckle, nasturtium, geranium, cedar, Norfolk island pine (?) and others. Read the rest of this entry »